Snowsport

Sun protection guidelines for those participating, spectating, or working in sport or outdoor recreation. The following specific tips and advice have been developed with the help of Snowsport England.

Snowsport

  1. In altitudes of around 10,000 feet, the sun’s UV radiation intensity is 25% stronger than it would be at sea level. Apply a broad-spectrum product with an SPF of 30 or higher, paying special attention to all exposed skin.
  2. Once applied to the skin, reapply sunscreen every 2 hours, or more often if you are prone to excessive sweating.
  3. The sun is strongest between 11am and 3pm depending on the season and your location, so ensure you pay special attention to sun protection during this time.
  4. Avoid damage to eyes by wearing UV protection ski goggles or masks. If they aren’t UV protected, sun radiation can still cause sun damage to the cornea of the eye.
  5. A skin helmet not only offers crash protection, but it will also ensure that the vulnerable areas (your forehead, scalp, and ears) are protected from the sun.
  6. Make sure to keep hydrated by keeping a bottle or ideally a bladder of water in your backpack.
  7. Wearing extra clothing is the best way to keep your skin safe. Don’t be tempted to strip off when skiing on a hot day, instead opt for a skin-tight alternative that covers your arms and legs.
  8. Don’t forget to carry a lip balm with SPF protection and reapply frequently to ensure your lips are adequately protected and hydrated.
  9. Even if you are cold and the sky is overcast, harmful rays will still reach your exposed skin, so ensure you sun protect!
  10. Some sunscreens are made specifically for Snowsport and provide extra protection from wind, dry skin and other concerns.

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